Social housing

​NCAT deals with social housing tenancy disputes between social housing provider landlords and tenants under the Residential Tenancies Act 2010.

Social housing cases are managed through NCAT's Consumer and Commercial Division.

What is social housing

Social housing is owned or managed by a government authority or community housing providers and made available for rent to eligible persons. Social housing includes:

  • Public housing owned or managed by Housing NSW or NSW Land and Housing Corporation.
  • Community housing managed by community housing associations.
  • Aboriginal housing owned by Aboriginal corporations including Local Aboriginal Land Councils and the Aboriginal Housing Off​ice.

All social housing tenancies are covered by the Residential Tenancies Act 2010. View the definition of social housing provider under the Act.

How to apply

To make an application to NCAT, complete an application form and lodge with the appropriate fee. 

Fees

Fees are payable for social housing applications. View our fees and charges or apply for a fee waiver.

Form

​Online

​Social housing application (PDF , 216.8 KB)

Apply now

Termination and possession application (PDF , 216.0 KB)

Apply now

Rental bond application (PDF , 189.3 KB)

Apply now

What happens next

Social housing applications are listed for conciliation and hearing. Check the correspondence or notice you receive from NCAT carefully and follow the instructions provided.

Orders NCAT can make 

NCAT has jurisdiction to determine social housing matters up to $30,000 for rental bond matters and $15,000 in respect to any other matter.

NCAT cannot determine appeals about administrative decisions made by a social housing provider such as eligibility, allocations, rent subsidies and transfers.

Legislation

Residential Tenancies Act 2010

Useful resources

Refer to the fact sheet for the types of orders that can be made under the Residential Tenancies Act 2010.

Organisations that can help

NCAT cannot provide legal advice. Find out how we can and cannot assist. Below are some organisations that can provide help or advice about your case.

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